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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
here. >> that's my question. can pakistan's military take on the taliban and militancy without u.s. money and resources, reza? >> reporter: well, look. they have a big army. 600,000 soldiers. it's one of the biggest armies of the world. they are not the best trained army, not the most proficient when it comes to fighting and insurgency. fighting that the taliban, that they've needed the help of the u.s. in the past, but, again, they're saying they don't need the help anymore. they're going to continue to fight without the u.s.' help. but it doesn't square with previous statements made in the past. previous demands for the u.s. to give them more money, give them resources, claims that they need help. now they say they don't need help. i think this is gamesmanship and i think all of this really underscores a troubled relationship, but i think what's important to point out is though the relationship is hurting there is no indication that it will end. both countries realize that they need one another so i think there are indications that it will stagger forward despite the troubles.
considered taliban-free forever, in fact, but this is also an area where two americans were killed. it goes to show you this is an area considered to be the safe part of afghanistan, but still we're seeing americans as well as nato forces dying. >> yeah. well, we don't like hearing that news. thank you for delivering it nonetheless. nbc's atia in kabul. >>> msnbc military analyst jack jacobs. good morning to you. >> good morning to you, alex. >> is this premature, even dangerous thinking on behalf of the new secretary of defense leon panetta saying we're going cloes to defeating laid? >> there's a lot of public relations involved. is he going to carry on a policy that was started before and expanded, and, of course, he is going to say after the killing of osama bin laden that, in fact, the thing is almost over. there's a lot of public relations involved. on the other hand, there's some truth in it too. al qaeda has been fragmented. that's a good news and the bad news, as we've said before, is al qaeda in iraq is al qaeda in the peninsula and yemen and africa and so on that means that we can
.s. troops they shouldn't be too dramatic or swift to withdraw before al qaeda and taliban are defeated. >> christiane, i appreciate your analysis. i want to remind everybody, be sure to watch christiane a little later this morning on "this week." she has an exclusive interview with white house chief of staff bill daley. bianna, over to you. >>> not too far from here at rancho mirage, california, preparations are under way for the funeral of former first lady betty ford. family and friends will gather tuesday for a celebration of life service. barbara pinto has more on the nation saying good-bye to a brave and beloved woman who touched so many lives. >> r rorter: her candor and courage touched the nation. and now we know more how betty ford's family will pay tribute. >> people in america and across the world, they are going to say good-bye and they want to pay tribute to her. and private services in n public california and michigan. mrs. ford, who died of natural causus friday at age 93, will first be remembered in a private service tuesday in palm desert, california, near where she and
was on the run for 16 years and the taliban reportedly training chinese muslim kids in terror camps now. the kids were shown how to plant roadside bombs. london's daily mail said they posted a recruitment video of the young terrorists in training. brian? >> stepping up security screening after new evidence shows that terrorists are using surgically implanted bombs to attack america and americans. some of these doctors of death have been educated here in the united states of america. joining us right now from phoenix is the president of the american-islamic forum for democracy. say it ain't so, doctor, this is true? >> well, i don't think we should be surprised. i mean, these positions, we've seen it with the bombers and we've seen it an mit scientist and an emergency doc that was healing al-qaida to go back. we've seen it from dictators like one in syria who was trained in london and went back to be one of the worst dictators in the middle east. >> i want to run through some of them who have been chronicled. this guy that you just mentioned went to columbia. >> yeah. remember, they are trained
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)